FEBRUARY 8, 2018

How to Make Sure You’re Not One of THOSE Tourists in Ireland

blonde american tourist in ireland

(There’s a presumption that American Tourists are) …insensitive rude people who think the only way to do things properly is their way. This presumption isn’t limited to Irish People of course. But I find I have to prove myself to not be “one of those Yanks” before people will trust me and open up. However, it is ALWAYS worth the effort. – My friend Kass McGann, of Reconstructing History.

We’ve all met them.

The ones who make us cringe a little inside. The ones who presume we’re idiots and proceed to explain how things should be done right. The ones who are loud and brash and rude.

But, #NotAllAmericans… amirite?!

Actually, yeah. Thankfully that stereotypical USA Tourist in Ireland is only a sliver of the tourism trade here – we had 1,294,000 total visitors from the USA in 2016. They weren’t all insensitive eejits, or we’d have had a feckin’ riot on our hands like. There’s only so many times a proud people can bear being called cute or quaint.

So, for those of you travelling to Ireland who have a genuine love and respect for the land and people, who would love to seriously connect here… how do you do it right?

Here’s some Handy Tips for American Tourists!


Listen More Than You Talk

Ok so this one could fall into the category of giving your Irish hosts a wee ego stroke, coz we do love the sound of our own voices, for the most part. Fair enough.

But it’s also about hearing the stories. Given half a chance, most Irish folk will blether away for hours with story after story, all leading into each other and weaving round in a fierce tangle of history, culture, experience, and plain old gossip.

It’s actually amazing when you catch someone in a good flow and just leave em off. They’ll chat for hours, especially if there’s drinks to hand to whet the whistle a wee bit and keep things flowing smoothly.

And not just one to one either. Take a bus, or go sit in a busy cafe or pub up at the bar. As a writer, and someone genuinely fascinated by people – I do this a lot. Irish people are most often emotive, and passionate, and so feckin’ funny you’ll be hard pushed not to give away your eavesdropping by cracking the fuck up laughing.

You’ll learn a lot when you listen.

Act Like a (Polite) Guest in Someone Else’s House

My friend Kass again, she reckons this is the way to go. She explained:

acting like you’re a guest in someone else’s house is a good idea. I think we Americans go about the world with a “customer is always right” attitude and that doesn’t help when you’re trying to get to know another culture. I once knew a man in an Irish guest house who went into the landlady’s kitchen UNINVITED to “teach her how to make eggs properly”. I could have cried. I was completely embarrassed even though I didn’t know the guy.

Yeah, all of us working in tourism have met that guy.

Things are gonna be different in another culture. Sometimes, really really different. AND THAT’S OK. It will happen, so just go with it.

You’re (hopefully) travelling here to experience Irish culture, not try to turn it into American culture. We eat our fucking eggs differently, ok? (Um, some of us also curse a lot, in case you hadn’t noticed. Best get used to that one too.)

Don’t be that guy.

On the Etiquette of Accepting Stuff That’s Offered

Hospitality is a big deal in Ireland.

Like, a really big deal. I’m not sure how to emphasise this appropriately enough, so you should go an watch Mrs. Doyle’s Best Bits. You don’t feel like it? But sure, whyever not? Go on and watch her now. Ah you will. Go on, Go on, Go on. Go On.

There now. See what I mean?

The thing is though, when someone offers, it’s polite not to snatch the hand off them for a sandwich or a cuppa, no matter how starving or parched you’re feeling. You do the polite refusal. Then they ask are ya sure? You might think you’re safe enough to say yes the second time… but no. You politely refuse again. It’s only on the third time, when they ask are ya REALLY sure, then you can say “Ah go on so, I will, thanks”.

I don’t know why. It’s just how it’s done.

Oh, and don’t forget the crucial thing when this happens in a pub situation. Someone in a group will be feeling flaithulach and get a round in. Yes, I know ye all said ye’d stay on your own and not buy into getting rounds of drinks. It’s just a thing that happens sometimes. Unless you’re stingy, and nobody wants to be stingy.

So, even if you’re still, really, definitely not getting into rounds… you HAVE to buy that person a drink back. Yup, even if they don’t ever wet their lips with it. You just have to.

On that note… Take this Test and figure out if you’re Stingy or Flaithulach, so you can be prepared for these things. You might want to warn folk.

It’s for the best.

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Education Comments (5)

  • Julie March 15, 2018

    What’s “Mrs. Doyle’s Best Bits”?

    • admin March 25, 2018

      Click and it’ll link through – or here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RSW6oDckOjo

      Lora

    • Jamie-Rose May 31, 2018

      Mrs Doyle is the priests’ housekeeper in Father Ted, an Irish comedy TV programme. Mrs Doyle is a comic example of the “Ah, go on, you will, ” answer to someone who politely refuses hospitality in Ireland or Northern Britain with her “Will ye have a cup of tea?” “Ah, no, thank you , Mrs Doyle. ” “Ah, go on, now, you’ll have a cup!” “No, really, thank you,” ” Ah, you will, go on, you will so.” “No, not just now …” ” Ah, go on, go on, go on…” until she browbeats the poor soul into accepting a cup. Here’s a link to Mrs Doyle’s Best Bits on Youtube

      https://youtu.be/RSW6oDckOjo

  • Jade Dance April 5, 2018

    Thus the question arises, how does one politely decline when one truly cannot partake? I don’t know that I want to say “I surely appreciate your kindness, but I’ll toss it all back up on your rug if do”.

    • admin April 8, 2018

      “I’m allergic”, or similar, eg. intolerant, have become common knowledge and are widely accepted in Ireland today 😉
      And actually, literally saying that… “I surely appreciate your kindness, but I’ll toss it all back up on your rug if do”, would be a grand ice breaker, get you a laugh, and usually an offer of something else to replace the thing that would make you ill.

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